Episode 60 – Bong Joon-ho’s Barking Dogs Never Bite (2000)

Pot of radishes, dog, shadow man.

Bong Joon-ho’s 2000 feature film debut, Barking Dogs Never Bite, is a master class in dark comedy. It begins with a barking dog, ends with a professorship bought with cash in a cake box, and in between includes sun-dried radishes, a shadow man in a basement, a high-speed chase through an apartment complex, and two murdered dogs. It’s funny and tragic and surprising and stirring. We watched it on a DVD that came in the mail. O, those year 2000 days.

Thanks to slfhlp for providing us some SICK BEATS for our intro and outro.

As always, send yr comments, questions, and movie suggestions to twoforspacejamplease @ gmail.com and subscribe on iTunes or Spotify.

Episode 59 – Old (2021)

Looking: tales must contain haecceities that are not simply emplacements, but concrete individuations that have a status of their own and direct the metamorphosis of things and subjects.

We did something we haven’t done in about fifteen years and watched an M. Night Shyamalan movie. Old follows a family on vacation at a posh tropical resort where things take a nightmarish turn after they’re taken to a secluded beach reserved for “special” guests and discover that they’re aging extremely rapidly. Spoiler alert: Joe is an M. Night Shyamalan apologist!!

Looking: Between the extreme slowness and vertiginous speeds of geology and astronomy, Michel Tournier places meteorology, where meteors live at our pace: “A cloud forms in the sky like an image in my brain, he wind blows like I breathe, a rainbow spans the horizon for as long as my heart needs to reconcile itself to life, the summer passes like vacation drifts by.
Looking: Aeon: the indefinite time of the event, the floating line that knows only speeds and continually divides that which transpires into an already-there that is at the same time not-yet-here, a simultaneous too-late and too-early, a something that is both going to happen and has just happened.

Thanks to slfhlp for providing us some SICK BEATS for our intro and outro.

As always, send yr comments, questions, and movie suggestions to twoforspacejamplease @ gmail.com and subscribe on iTunes or Spotify.

Episode 58 – The Green Knight (2021)

“A Filmed Adaptation of the Chivalric Romance by Anonymous,” emblazoned across the screen in old-timey font, is how we’re introduced to David Lowery’s The Green Knight. The film is based on the Medieval poem “Sir Gawain and the Green Knight,” and we follow the legendary knight of King Arthur’s round table as he takes part in a pretty fucked up “Christmas game.” What follows is a fever dream involving bandits, an undead saint, giants, a talking fox, a magical belt, and a dangerous trudge toward his own beheading. We were into it.

PS – Cheryl mispronounces “Gawain” throughout the whole episode so….apologies!!

Thanks to slfhlp for providing us some SICK BEATS for our intro and outro.

As always, send yr comments, questions, and movie suggestions to twoforspacejamplease @ gmail.com and subscribe on iTunes or Spotify.

Episode 55 – Zola (2021)

“Ya’ll want to hear a story about why me & this bitch here fell out???????? It’s kind of long but full of suspense.”

And so Zola begins. Based on an epic, viral 2015 Twitter thread written by A’Ziah King and dubbed by fans as #TheStory, Zola is INTENSE. We talk through the movie’s representation of sex work, its multiple tonal registers, the stellar performances, and this new era (?) of social media-sourced movie making.

Thanks to slfhlp for providing us some SICK BEATS for our intro and outro.

As always, send yr comments, questions, and movie suggestions to twoforspacejamplease @ gmail.com and subscribe on iTunes or Spotify.

Episode 37 – Hillbilly Elegy

Everything Is Fine!

Ron Howard’s Hillbilly Elegy, based on the 2016 memoir of the same name by J.D. Vance, is bullshit, and we take a little time to talk about why. 


Referenced:

 Appalachian Reckoning: A Region Responds to Hillbilly Elegy edited by Anthony Harkins and Meredith McCarroll

An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz

Of special note:Amy Adams and Glenn Close have been nominated 13 times for an Academy Award between them, but neither have won yet.

Thanks to slfhlp for providing us some SICK BEATS for our intro and outro.

As always, send yr comments, questions, and movie suggestions to twoforspacejamplease @ gmail.com and subscribe on iTunes or wherever you do your podcast business.

Episode 15 – Midsommer (2019)

It’s like day 7 of our summer vacation and I ate so much I’m like uggggggggggghhhhhhhhhh.
fill yr precious sound cups

Dearest listeners, we have returned from a short break to get freaked out by this summer’s horror-pastoral freakout, Midsommer. We discuss literary precedents, communitarian-phobia in cinema, grad students as villains (I hate that I’m linking to Slate but C pointed out that our point had been made), and more. Also, stay tuned for our first episode featuring an interview with a writer-activist who is doing rad, necessary things. We’re freaking out about this, but in a different way. Skål! <drinks mushroom tea>

Episode 14 – The Wandering Earth (2019)

don’t worry there are so many explosions in this shot you just can’t see them

We streamed Frant Gwo’s mega-blockbuster The Wandering Earth after a long weekend of find a place to live seeking, flat tires, and dead batteries. Our initial take: it’s a fun asplode fest! Is there more to this movie as we talk it out? Find out, dear reader, by listening.

Also, here’s some context that we dug up after our talk: There’s a lot of buzz about this movie representing a landmark in Chinese cinema–it’s first Sci-Fi blockbuster. Here’s a Vice piece by Muqing Zhang on Western techno-orientalist reception of the movie.

Also, errata: the movie does explain something we think it doesn’t explain–an unexpected spike in Jupiter’s gravity. Maybe our batteries were dead.

Episode 9: Sorry to Bother You (2018)

After Green Book won an Oscar, we toyed w/hate-watching it since Feb cinema is a dumping ground for lame movies. We decided instead to return to Boots Riley’s powerhouse directorial debut Sorry to Bother You. We talk it over in an end-of-work-week fugue state, get wildly off topic, and work our way back to the point: we loved this movie real hard.